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Monday, November 13
 

1:00pm

 
Tuesday, November 14
 

7:00am

Exhibitor Setup (7:00-8:00 AM)
Tuesday November 14, 2017 7:00am - 8:00am
Exhibit Hall

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Tuesday November 14, 2017 7:30am - 9:30am
Plenary Hall

7:30am

Registration Opens
Tuesday November 14, 2017 7:30am - 2:00pm
Lobby

8:00am

Exhibit Hall Opens
Tuesday November 14, 2017 8:00am - 3:30pm
Exhibit Hall

8:30am

Welcome and Opening
  • Doug Banks, Executive Editor, Boston Business Journal
  • Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, Commonwealth of Massachusetts; Co-chair, Massachusetts STEM Advisory Council

Presentation of The Hall at Patriot Place 2017 Massachusetts STEM Teacher of the Year
  • Bryan Morry, Executive Director, The Hall at Patriot Place presented by Raytheon
  • Kathleen Malone, Derby Academy, Hingham

Raising the Bar: Building the Pipeline through STEM Education
  • Yvonne Spicer, Vice President of Advocacy & Educational Partnerships, National Center for Technological Literacy, Museum of Science, Boston

Tuesday November 14, 2017 8:30am - 9:30am
Plenary Hall

9:30am

Break
Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:30am - 9:45am
DCU Center 50 Foster Street, Worcester, MA

9:45am

2016 Digital Literacy and Computer Science Standards: Implementation and Licensure

Continuing the discussion from last year’s conference, which introduced “Digital Literacy and Computer Science (DLCS) Framework: Where are we now?”

K-12 educators, learning coaches, and administrators are invited to learn more about the key features of the 2016 DLCS standards, implications for curriculum and instruction, resources available, examples of efforts already undertaken by some districts and implementation initiatives and implications for licensure.


Speakers
AD

Anne DeMallie

Computer Science and STEM Integration Specialist, Department of Elementary and Secondary Education


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room C

9:45am

Adapting Digital Media for STEM Instruction
Explore how digital media can be adapted for STEM instruction in this session from WGBH Education and PBS LearningMedia. This session will focus on what makes good digital media for STEM instruction and illustrate how the STEM education team at WGBH takes media from a range of sources, including WGBH programs such as NOVA and PEEP and the Big Wide World, as well as content partners such as NASA and NOAA, to engage students in learning STEM concepts and practices. Participants will engage with different forms of media, all freely available on PBS LearningMedia, and learn how each is contexualized to support classroom use with diverse learners. Facilitators will highlight the strengths of different media types to support student learning of STEM standards, such as providing an authentic context, representing complex data sets, or showing phenomena that otherwise are difficult to view in the classroom. The goal of WGBH Education is to advance the effective use of media by helping educators use media from a variety of sources to engage students in STEM learning.

Speakers
LD

Laura Degelmann

Teacher, Malden Public Schools, and WGBH Teacher Advisor
JF

Jake Foster

Director of STEM Curriculum and Instruction, WGBH
CS

Caitlin Stier

STEM Project Director, WGBH


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Plenary Hall

9:45am

Engaging University Students in Co-design Projects with Partner Schools and Communities

There seems to be growing student interest in learning relevant STEM, design and entrepreneurship skills through real work with real people. D-Lab has been running project-based classes at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where university students from different disciplines come together to create innovations that address poverty with partner communities around the world. These opportunities have attracted diverse students to D-Lab, including a high number of female students (over 50%), international students, underrepresented minorities in STEM fields, and students from humanities and social sciences who are new to exploring STEM fields. Many alumni have continued on into STEM-related careers for positive social and environmental impact.

 

Running real projects in real communities comes with real responsibilities. This session will share what the D-Lab: Education course has learned over the years in providing university students with opportunities to work with youth and educators, co-developing educational technologies and hands-on STEM curricula with partner K-12 schools and communities in 5+ countries. The D-Lab: Education course aims to extend D-Lab’s hands-on approach to younger students by helping to create more accessible, relevant, and inspirational pre-tertiary STEM learning opportunities. There are diverse stakeholders in the D-Lab: Education model, including at the university level, in partner K-12 schools (educators, students, families), and within partner communities where the K-12 schools are located (residents, leadership, community-based organizations).

In this discussion plus hands-on idea generation session, we will engage universities, schools, and organizations in thinking through how to overcome some challenges of school-community partnerships and work towards developing impactful projects.


Speakers
JH

Jessica Huang

Instructor, D-Lab, MIT
LN

Lisa Nam

Instructor, D-Lab, MIT


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room E

9:45am

Exploring the “M” in Early Childhood STEM: Moving Beyond Rote Activities to Extend Concept Development

This hands-on workshop will help early childhood educators, directors, providers, and coaches to explore a variety of developmentally appropriate mathematical experiences to extend children’s knowledge in everyday routines or mathematics centers.

The word “mathematics” can cause adults to either quiver or smile in fascination. Regardless of your comfort level, early childhood mathematics doesn’t have to feel overwhelming, boring or tedious. As educators, we should instill an excitement about numbers, patterns, relationships, shapes and just talking about the math found all around us. Join us as we have some fun with mathematics through games and meaningful experiences that help students develop skills needed for future school success.

Presenters will share the approach used by The Hundred Acre School at Heritage Museums & Gardens, which moves away from the practice of using an isolated STEM-related lesson or activity and moves to transforming the learning environment and daily routine into an authentic STEM experience immersed in questions, vocabulary, and concepts. Presenters share how they have been able to do this in the area of mathematics by setting up demonstration areas during the workshop with materials but will explain the purpose, concepts, and questions that would enhance the students understanding of math concepts. Educators will also have the opportunity to explore how these concepts can be extended during a variety of daily routines like circle time, snack, transitions, and outdoors. Attendees are encouraged to share their experiences and how they would be able to incorporate these concepts into their classroom or learning environment.


Speakers
KB

Kori Bardige

Education Consultant and Owner, Learning Circle Consulting
MR

Melissa Russell

Preschool Director, The Hundred Acre School at Heritage Museums & Gardens


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Grand Ballroom North

9:45am

Growing Community Partnerships through Art to Engineering: STEM, STEAM, & Beyond

How do we inspire more girls and youth from groups underrepresented in the sciences to pursue STEM career pathways? This session will highlight two case-study partnerships between the Timothy Smith Network (TSN) of community technology centers in Roxbury, MA, and two local powerhouses of science and engineering— the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) and Northeastern University. Each partnership was focused around the adoption and implementation by TSN of an innovative technology-based curriculum for youth in out-of-school-time programs. The first is an astrophotography program, Youth Capture the Colorful Cosmos, which empowers participants to control real telescopes over the Internet to take images of space. Using the tools and techniques of professional astronomers, youth learn to enhance, analyze, and interpret their images by producing astrophotography exhibits for their peers, family, and the public. In the second partnership, TSN worked with the Northeastern College of Engineering to plan and launch a LEGO Robotics program. Under the mentorship of Northeastern students, youth gained important experience in the engineering design process.

The panelists will share the details of these successful STEM engagement programs, along with specific partnership strategies that have led to successful outcomes for participating middle-school aged youth. The discussion will highlight examples of how these programs were adapted, improved, and expanded via the sustained partnership with TSN and how the partnerships accomplished more than any of the individual organizations could do on their own.


Moderators
AL

Adreenne Law

Program Coordinator, Timothy Smith Network

Speakers
MD

Mary Dussault

Science Education Program Manager, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
SF

Susan Freeman

Director and Teaching Professor, First Year Engineering Program, Northeastern University College of Engineering


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Junior Ballroom

9:45am

How Can Local Businesses Engage and Drive STEM Education in Their Communities?

STEM education is highly important to schools and educators, but it is also imperative to local businesses in the STEM fields to maintain and drive a pipeline of talent for their workforce. General Dynamics Mission Systems has been engaged with STEM education in the local Berkshire County community for many years. The company and its employees have cultivated an annual set of educational events and STEM activities to enhance the STEM education happening in the classroom. This presentation will cover ideas on how businesses can further engage with their local community relative to STEM activities. Events and ideas to be discussed are site or facility field trips and tours, employee/ student shadowing, home grown engineering competitions, in-class workshops, and introduction to engineering and STEM presentations. In addition to these events we will discuss the benefits of participation in local community events such as science fairs, STEM Pipeline Networks, and interaction with other educational venues like museums, zoos, and farms. STEM education and enrichment is a partnership between educators, the community, and local businesses. Come learn how you can enhance STEM in your community.


Speakers
EB

Elizabeth Bocchino

Engineering Leadership Program Supervisor, General Dynamics Mission Systems
BM

Beth Mitchell

Director of Engineering Maritime and Strategic Systems, General Dynamics Mission Systems


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room B

9:45am

If You Build It, Will They Come? Reflections on the Vertex/Boston Public Schools Partnership

Representatives involved in the Vertex/Boston Public Schools (BPS) partnership will discuss the issues involved in establishing and maintaining a successful school/business relationship. This will be of interest to those companies who wish to connect with schools more closely. School leaders and teachers may also be interested in this session to learn how corporate relationships can benefit their students both during the academic year and summer.

 

Vertex is deeply committed to enhancing and promoting STEM education in the Boston community. The Vertex/BPS partnership was established in 2012 and Vertex has created academic and summer programs to engage BPS students.  This session will be a case study of our experience working together.

 

Panelists from Vertex, BPS and the Boston Private Industry Council will share their knowledge of what works and what does not work followed by questions from the audience in the hope that more schools and businesses will develop these relationships. The panel will also include BPS teacher and student voices that will speak to how the partnership impacts the classroom and their educational experiences.


Moderators
MK

Melodie Knowlton

Head, Vertex Learning Lab, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Speakers
SR

Stacia Reidy MacNaught

Vice President, External Affairs, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
MM

Makeeba McCreary

Managing Director and Senior Advisor of External Affairs, Boston Public Schools
AO

Alysia Ordway

Employer Engagement Director, Boston Private Industry Council


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room A

9:45am

MassBay’s STEM Mentor Program: Partnering with Industry to Promote Students’ Professional Success

Participants will learn about MassBay Community College’s STEM Mentor Program which brings together STEM students and regional STEM employers in one-on-one mentoring relationships and provides substantive, skills-based programs, and networking opportunities throughout the year.


Speakers
WG

Wanda Gleason

Coordinator, MassBay STEM Mentor Program, MassBay Community College
MA

Mark Anderson, Jr.

Chief, Military Project Management Branch, US Army Corps of Engineers
VK

Valerie Kapilow

Director, MassBay STEM Mentor Program, MassBay Community College



Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Conference Room 210

9:45am

Partnering on Biomedical Expeditions to Engage Underserved Students in STEM

Representatives from Novartis and two Cambridge charter schools will share information about their collaboration to develop biomedical learning expeditions for high school students. The presentation will provide an overview of the Novartis Community Exploration & Learning Lab (CELL) and the expedition format. The presenters will share examples of biomedical expeditions created as a result of this collaboration. Representatives will offer their perspectives on the collaboration, including what worked well and future directions. Most importantly, presenters will share how the collaboration has impacted student engagement in STEM. Participants will have the opportunity to brainstorm areas of improvement, provide feedback, and ask questions during this interactive session.


Moderators
RL

Russette Lyons

Head, Novartis Community Exploration & Learning Lab (CELL), Novartis
MS

Meghan Spencer

Program Specialist, Novartis Community Exploration & Learning Lab (CELL), Novartis

Speakers
JM

Jeff Molk

Science Teacher & Science Department Chair, Community Charter School of Cambridge (CCSC)
HS

Helen Shao

Science Teacher & 7-12 Science Coordinator, Prospect Hill Academy Charter School (PHA)



Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Grand Ballroom Center

9:45am

Selecting and Designing Innovative K-12 Engineering Resources to Transcend Stereotypes

As our need for engineers increases, so does our need to foster STEM identity and engage a broad range of young people in engineering. Unfortunately, many engineering curricula subtly or explicitly pander to stereotypes about engineering (construction, hard hats) or about gender (trucks and bridges or pink and princesses). With expertise in the design of imaginative, story-based K-12 engineering curriculum that appeals to girls and boys, facilitators will instead present the research-based importance of using nuanced, interdisciplinary resources. Then, presenters and participants will work together to create a draft rubric for distinguishing innovative resources--those that transcend stereotypes and portray engineering as a collaborative field that helps society--from more traditional ones. Participants will use the rubric in teams to evaluate a variety of published resources used in K-12 classrooms and report out on their results. Participants and presenters will discuss the most important characteristics of meaningful curricula and recommend changes to the rubric criteria. Finally, presenters will share curricula and resources they’ve found most valuable.  Participants will leave empowered to inspire future engineers using excellent resources or prepared to design their own! After the conference, facilitators will create and format a final rubric and send it out to participants.  


Speakers
IH

Isabel Huff

Outreach Coordinator, Through My Window
BM

Beth McGinnis-Cavanaugh

Professor, Springfield Technical Community College; Principal Investigator, Through My Window


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Grand Ballroom South

9:45am

STEM@Work: The State’s Campaign for STEM Internships for High School Students

The number one challenge facing Massachusetts’ innovation economy is the demand for a qualified and skilled workforce. There are more open jobs in STEM than employees to fill them.  This challenge will only grow with an aging workforce that will be retiring without enough qualified replacements. The solution starts in our K-12 schools. We need to get students excited about STEM well before college by offering them a wide range of STEM activities and experiences throughout their K-12 education.

One very powerful contribution to that effort is to offer high school students paid internships in STEM fields. This strategy has been selected by the state’s STEM Advisory Council as one of three core strategies it has adopted to engage students in STEM subjects.

Shailah Stewart, director of the state’s Connecting Activities Initiative, will give an overview of the STEM@Work Campaign. Representatives from businesses who have long hosted high school interns and those who hosted their first high school interns in the summer of 2017 will share their experiences.


Moderators
SS

Shailah Stewart

Coordinator, School to Career Connecting Activities, MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Speakers
MG

Michael Glass

Vice President, Talent Management and Development, Thermo Fisher Scientific
MM

Mark McAuliffe

Director, Global Talent Acquisition, Waters Corporation
MR

Matt Roszell

Head of Internal Communications & Community Engagement, Vertex Pharmaceuticals


Tuesday November 14, 2017 9:45am - 10:35am
Meeting Room D

10:35am

Break
Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:35am - 10:55am
DCU Center 50 Foster Street, Worcester, MA

10:55am

A Playbook on Gender Equity in Tech: Best Practices in Recruiting, Retaining, and Advancing Women

In summer 2017, AAUW and Dell released our “Playbook on Gender Equity in Tech: Best Practices in Recruiting, Retaining, and Advancing Women.” This publication provides practical solutions for improving the status of diversity and inclusion in the tech space by weaving together crucial takeaways from existing literature, outlining research-based strategies for the workplace, and sharing examples of promising practices being used by industry thought-leaders.

The goal of this session is to equip attendees with a top line understanding of key strategies that can be effective in recruiting, retaining, and advancing women in the STEM fields. The intended audience includes corporate diversity and inclusion and human resources professionals as well as women who are working in the computing, engineering, and technology industries.


Moderators
KB

Kathleen Buse

Research Consultant, AAUW

Speakers
JA

Jessica Anderson

North America Giving Manager, Dell EMC
KC

Kim Churches

CEO, AAUW


Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Grand Ballroom South

10:55am

Bringing Science to Life: Using Realistic Medical Emergencies with a Patient Simulator “STAN" to Engage and Inspire High School Students

Many programs expose students to the richness of medical science careers. But many students are left wondering “Can I do it?”. When faced with the reality of: costs, length and rigor of postsecondary education, students’ self-confidence wanes. Our unique pedagogy embedded in a high school biology course instills the essential 21st century skills (problem solving, critical thinking and teamwork) in conjunction with self-confidence and self-efficacy that students need to take risks and succeed.

The HMS MEDscience program was started in 2008 with one Boston Public School (BPS) and has grown significantly to the current nine BPS and additional suburban schools. Our students are 54% female, 52% Black, 26% Hispanic or Latino and 18% were classified as English as a second language (ESL) learners (2015/16 data). We are tasked with inspiring the next generation of successful STEM students by engaging them in emergency medical simulations, teaching them real medical skills (intubation, IVs, and suturing), and exposing them to careers in STEM fields. Our goal is to close the achievement and inspiration gap in the BPS and encourage underrepresented students to take risks and be confident. Our student reflections and surveys indicate that we are successful in our mission, specifically in the areas of teamwork and self- confidence.


Moderators
NO

Nancy Oriol

Faculty Associate Dean for Community Engagement in Medical Education, Associate Professor of Anaesthesia, Harvard Medical School
PR

Paul Reville

Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Speakers
JJ

Julie Joyal

Executive Director, Harvard Medical School, MEDscience Program
CM

Colby Moore Reilly

Education Program Lead, Harvard Medical School, MEDscience Program


Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Conference Room 210

10:55am

Creative Robotics Across the Curriculum: An Innovative Partnership Project

Integrating robotics into core curricula exposes more students to innovative computer science experiences and can promote deeper engagement with content (Gura, 2011; Gura & King, 2007).  By seeing creative modes of scientific exploration, students may develop a better understanding of STEM generally (NSF, 2015).

To increase opportunities for middle school students to engage in technology innovation, this NSF-funded Math Science Partnership project, involving higher education, evaluation, and school district partners, designed the Creative Robotics project. They studied its implementation with grade 6-8 public school teachers who integrated robotics units into their science, health, art, English, and social studies courses.

Successful curricular integration required intentionally designed connections between robotics activities and disciplinary learning goals, allowing teachers to deepen their thinking about topics and reconsider their typical pedagogical approach. Robotics units supported learners by creating universally designed class environments that offered multiple modes of engagement and expression. They helped some students translate abstract concepts into concrete exemplars and to explore new subject matter, while supporting the development of technological fluency.

This session will offer examples (including student artifacts and classroom video) of robotics units in several content areas, enabling administrators, teachers, and/or technology specialists to identify ways for integrating creative technologies at the classroom, school, and district levels. Session participants will learn how partnerships can support technology innovations like Creative Robotics, and they will consider how partnerships among schools, higher education, and industry could create career pathways that appeal to a wider range of students.


Speakers
DB

Debra Bernstein

Senior Researcher, TERC
MC

Michael Cassidy

Research Associate, TERC
KM

Karen Mutch-Jones

Co-Director, STEM Education Evaluation Center, TERC



Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Grand Ballroom Center

10:55am

Establishing Effective Partnerships Across the Community College Sector

Scale is one of those buzz words in thinking about initiatives that can cause change. However, anyone implementing projects knows that in order to scale impact, you need strong partnerships. Can such partnerships support a system-level model for promoting student engagement and success across an entire Commonwealth? This session highlights the efforts of the STEM Starter Academy Initiative, administrated through the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education, to support the STEM pipeline at all 15 of the public community colleges in Massachusetts. Through this work the campuses have built upon existing STEM programming to provide a cohesive set of student supports through the coordination of different offices on campuses and by learning from each other on what is working to impact student retention rates and program completion. This work has spawned several vibrant partnerships, and connected an active and diverse learning community that is deeply committed to inter- and intra-campus collaboration.

During this session we will review key steps in the development of collaborations within and across campuses, highlighting specific instances of success, challenge, and emergent best practices. Audience members will learn about effective inter- and intra- campus collaborations across the system through the lens of STEM Starter Academy programming.  Key steps in the process for developing these collaborations will be highlighted during this session, as well as the practices and lessons learned to make this collaboration turn into a true learning community that can be applied to other regional and state-wide partnerships.


Moderators
AL

Allison Little

Executive Director, STEM, Massachusetts Department of Higher Education

Speakers
DC

Darcy Carlson

STEM Starter Academy Project Coordinator, Quinsigamond Community College
JJ

Jeremiah Johnson

Senior Research Manager, UMass Donahue Institute
LR

Laura Rubin

Dean of STEM & Education, North Shore Community College


Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Meeting Room A

10:55am

Helping Preschool Teachers Engage Families in Supporting Young Children’s Mathematics Learning

Young children’s mathematics learning is most meaningful when it is integrated across the various settings where they live and learn—at home, at school, and in the broader community. However, despite the recognized value of family engagement in young children’s learning, educators and parents alike are often unsure about the concrete action steps they can take to increase family involvement in mathematics learning. In this early education session, we will present the work from the Games for Young Mathematicians Family Engagement project, which focuses on helping preschool teachers effectively engage families in supporting their children’s mathematics learning through fun, playful home mathematics activities. This project provided mathematics and family engagement professional development (PD) to 70 Head Start teachers across three programs during the 2016-2017 school year. The family engagement PD focused on engaging families in home-based mathematics activities that complemented math games teachers were using with children in the classroom. Researchers gave teachers materials to send home with the children that included math mini-books and home versions of the classroom math games. These materials included tips for families about important preschool mathematics concepts such as shapes and their attributes, patterns, and number sense. The panel will include two Head Start teachers from the study who will share insights about how they used the family engagement materials and teachings to deepen their work with families.


Speakers
MC

Michie Collins

Head Start Teacher, Greater Lawrence Community Action Council, Inc.
ML

Michelle Lambert

Head Start Teacher, Greater Lawrence Community Action Council, Inc.
KO

Kelley O’Carroll

Research Associate II, EDC
HR

Heidi Rosenberg

Research Scientist, EDC



Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Meeting Room B

10:55am

Invention Education and STEM: Preparing Students from Diverse Backgrounds for the Innovation Economy

This joint presentation by the Academy of Applied Science, the Lemelson-MIT Program, and a leading invention educator addresses the urgent need for greater diversity among the ranks of leading innovators in the U.S. It will also address partnerships needed between K-12 educators, the higher education community and others to ensure that new learning opportunities are afforded to students in K-12 all along the education continuum. Participants will examine invention education as a strategy for attracting more students from underrepresented backgrounds into STEM college/career pathways. Panelists will share data from three existing programs (InvenTeams, JV InvenTeams, and the Young Inventors’ Program) that support this new approach to integrating STEM, discuss free teaching resources and support available from a range of program providers across all of grades K-12, and will highlight grant opportunities available within different grade spans. Ways educators have structured invention education programs in both formal and informal settings and information about the alignment with state standards will also be shared. Presenters will discuss strategies used to create partnerships within local communities and beyond to support students’ and teachers’ work. An example of one teacher’s journey into invention education and what it has meant for students will be explored as a telling case.


Speakers
LE

Leigh Estabrooks

Invention Education Officer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Engineering, Lemelson-MIT Program
NM

Nicole MacMillan

Director, Young Inventors’ Program/Invention New England, Academy of Applied Science
TP

Tony Perry

Invention Education Coordinator, Lemelson-MIT Program, MIT School of Engineering
DS

Doug Scott

Technology/Engineering Subject Matter Leader for grades 6-12, Hopkinton Public Schools


Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Junior Ballroom

10:55am

Mission To Mars – An Interdisciplinary Unit Using the Engineering Design Process and PBL

The specific examples and materials that will be presented were created for 10th grade students in a high school STEM program, but could easily be adapted for other age groups.  The STEM EC/HS program at Marlborough High School includes two cohorts of students, one in 9th grade and one in 10th grade.  These students complete semester long projects using the Engineering Design Process and Project-based learning.  We will be presenting the 10th grade, second semester project, Mission to Mars. Students are placed in groups of four and take on the roles of CEO, Chief Engineer, Director of Business Development and Director of Community Development. They form space exploration companies, including names and logos to complete the project. Their challenge is to design four prototypes. Companies create marketing materials and a trade show booth for our STEM Expo. Industry professionals from the Marlborough area come to the June Expo and act as NASA representatives to choose the top company to support NASA’s mission to Mars.

Participants in this workshop will be able to facilitate this project-based unit, using the EDP in a high school classroom. They will receive materials for planning, organizing, pacing and grading a project-based unit. They will be able to explain the steps of the Engineering Design Process with an example of an actual prototype and describe the contributions from history, ELA, math, science and engineering to this process. They will also get to design one component of the project to model the student experience.


Moderators
MF

Megan Fenneuff

Math Teacher, Marlborough High School

Speakers
PD

Paul Duplessis

Engineering Teacher, Marlborough High School
SG

Stephanie Gill

Biology Teacher, Marlborough High School
LS

Lindsay Shomphe

English Teacher, Marlborough High School


Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Meeting Room E

10:55am

Modest Funding with Big STEM Impacts: 5-Year District Partnership Increases Enriched STEM Learning

A strong multiyear partnership is inspiring student STEM learning and teacher effectiveness in two high-needs urban districts in Massachusetts: Lowell and Worcester. In Lowell for six years, this partnership is rooted in the district’s vision and strategic plan for STEM, and partners participate in district-wide STEM planning meetings.

Hear from district leaders and STEM coordinators about how the partnership works, data on why it has been successful in impacting student learning and school culture, and what new challenges it addresses.

Three key areas of the partnership are funded by MSSEF’s Curious Minds Initiative (http://scifair.com/curious-minds) and leverage each other’s impact: (1) STEM teacher professional development; (2) mini-grants for schools to expand student research opportunities and build a science fair program; and (3) mentoring for students working on STEM innovation projects. In Lowell, mentoring became the focus of the district’s weekly afterschool STEM Club, and student participation grew rapidly by word-of-mouth - from a few students to over 250 who opt to stay after school over four months. A STEM Facilitator recruits and coordinates mentors (STEM professionals and college majors) and is a resource to participating STEM teachers. All eight middle schools opted in, and the district now funds their teachers’ stipends. Total costs for the ramped-up program are remarkably low, ~$130/student/year, including student materials, teacher PD and stipends, and showcase events.

This partnership model was designed from the start to be adapted by other districts. Please join us for discussion of successes and challenges, and learn how your school(s) can benefit.


Moderators
BG

Barnas G. Monteith

President, Tumblehome Learning

Speakers
KB

Kathy Berube

K-12 Science & Engineering Liaison, Worcester Public Schools
MB

Maureen Binienda

Superintendent, Worcester Public Schools
MC

Martha Cohn

STEM Coordinator, Lowell Public Schools
WF

William F. Rigney

STEM Educational Consultant


Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Meeting Room C

10:55am

Teach Students to Ask Their Own STEM Questions: Introduction to the Question Formulation Technique

A good question can spark curiosity and fuel creativity, understanding, and innovation. We know from research and from educators across the country that question-formulation is an increasingly vital skill for critical thinking, media literacy, and civic engagement in the 21st century. And as a part of many new standards, including the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), students are expected to formulate, explore, and use their own questions. Yet, it is rare that the skill of question formulation is deliberately taught to students. How can we transform teaching and learning and build the capacity for all students to take greater ownership of their learning and develop higher order thinking skills through question-asking?

Learn the Question Formulation Technique (QFT), a simple yet powerful step-by-step strategy to teach students how to ask, improve, and use their own questions. On their own initiative and without any mandate, more than 250,000 educators in diverse pre-k through higher education settings worldwide are now using the QFT simply because it helps their students become more curious and fully engaged learners.

Participants will experience the QFT themselves, see examples of how the QFT is used in science classrooms, explore how the QFT address the NGSS, and learn more about how the QFT benefits student learning. Participants will identify ways they can implement the QFT immediately to teach their students how to ask their own questions that will ignite their own STEM curiosity and investigation.


Speakers
NB

Nicole Bolduc

7th Grade Science Teacher, Ellington Public Schools, Ellington, CT
DR

Dan Rothstein

Co-Director, The Right Question Institute
SW

Sarah Westbrook

Director of Professional Learning, The Right Question Institute


Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Grand Ballroom North

10:55am

Work in Progress: How Business Leaders are Helping Close the Skills Gap
According to a survey of Massachusetts employers, 75% report difficulty filling open positions.  A recent report by the national Business Roundtable (BRT) confirms this is a problem nationally as well, finding that the nation’s economic growth “is hindered because the skills of today’s workers have not kept up with the requirements of current and future jobs.”  Both the BRT report and one by the Massachusetts Business Roundtable highlight unique partnerships between business and education to address this issue, and call on business to seek strong partnerships with education at all levels to develop scalable solutions.  Keynoted by the Chair of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable, this session will explore various types of skills gaps, their genesis, and what business leaders are doing to address them.

Moderators
JC

JD Chesloff

Executive Director, Massachusetts Business Roundtable

Speakers
JB

Jay Benson

Lexington Manufacturing Site Lead, Shire Pharmaceuticals
AC

Anthony Consigli

CEO, Consigli Construction
BP

Beth Phalen

President and General Manager, Data Protection Division, Dell EMC
MR

Marcy Reed

Chief of Business Operations, National Grid
KW

Kelli Wells

Executive Director of Education and Skills, GE Foundation



Tuesday November 14, 2017 10:55am - 11:45am
Meeting Room D

11:45am

Luncheon Buffet
Tuesday November 14, 2017 11:45am - 1:00pm
Plenary Hall

12:30pm

Luncheon Plenary
  • Doug Banks, Executive Editor, Boston Business Journal
  • J. Lynn Griesemer, Executive Director, UMass Donahue Institute; Associate Vice-President, Economic Development, University of Massachusetts President's Office 
  • Jim Peyser, Secretary of Education, Commonwealth of Massachusetts
  • John C. Warner, President and Chief Technology Officer, The Warner Babcock Institute for Green Technology

Tuesday November 14, 2017 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Plenary Hall

1:30pm

Break
Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:30pm - 1:45pm
DCU Center 50 Foster Street, Worcester, MA

1:45pm

Beyond Counting and Naming Shapes: Math All Day for Under 5s

In this active, hands-on session, participants will learn playful and impactful ways to support young children’s understanding of spatial relationships, patterns, measurement, quantities, and everyday math vocabulary. These mathematical areas are often given less emphasis in early childhood programs, yet, according to a burgeoning body of research, preschool skills in these areas are highly predictive of later school success.

During the session, participants will:

• Become familiar with several interdisciplinary math activities for young children in these critical math areas;

• Deepen understanding of children’s mathematical development in these areas;

• Learn and practice ways to talk with children about math so as to engage them in exploring, noticing, showing, and explaining, and to ensure that they develop comfort and confidence in math;

• Learn and practice ways to read aloud storybooks while emphasizing math concepts;

• Understand how these activities set children on the trajectory of the MA Curriculum Framework for Mathematics for PK.

The session draws on methods and materials from a research-based English/Spanish math program developed collaboratively by YMCA Early Learning Readiness (in MA, CA, and NJ) and TERC, a STEM education non-profit in Cambridge, MA. External evaluation demonstrates that this program succeeds in deepening mathematical impact of community-based preschool programs, including engaging children in mathematical thinking and reasoning and supporting educators and caregivers who are initially uncomfortable with math.

This session is intended for early childhood educators and for pre- and in-service early childhood educators. Participants who are parents or grandparents of young children are also welcome.

Speakers
MK

Marlene Kliman

Senior Scientist, TERC
AM

Audrey Martinez-Gudapakkam

Research Associate, TERC



Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Grand Ballroom Center

1:45pm

Cross-grade Partnerships in STEM: Fostering Community Connection and Deeper Conceptual Understanding

Come join Belchertown Public School teachers, in our 7th year of cross-grade partnerships, as we present multiple examples of successful activities partnering high school with elementary school students. Since winning the Toyota Tapestry grant in 2011, the BEST (Belchertown Environment, Science and Technology) effort has grown to include a monthly after school program, Ecomentors, as well as cross-grade garden-based activities, and the wildly successful 2nd Grade Lake Wallace field trip, in which the BHS Ecology students run interdisciplinary, multimodality stations for the entire 2nd grade, all within walking distance of the schools.  Engage in a discussion of the potential for participating in Schoolyard Ecology projects through Harvard Forest’s LTER K-12 Education program. Get introduced to the dual garden lessons, Let Them Eat Kale and It Takes a Village to Raise a Meal. Consider the potential of cross-grade partnerships for engaging your reluctant learners, showing them how fulfilling it can be to step out of your comfort zone to do something great for your community. We’ll also share some of the positive press these activities have garnered, and how we have used this as leverage to help our administrators more fully support constructivist, whole-child STEM learning. Share your vision with us and we’ll work through a brainstorming session to help you implement cross-grade partnerships within your own school/system.


Speakers
DC

Darryl Clark

Grade 2 Teacher, Swift River Elementary School
LH

Louise H. Levy

Science Teacher, Belchertown High School
DM

David Monroe

Science ILT Leader/Teacher, Belchertown High School


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Grand Ballroom South

1:45pm

Developing and Maintaining Business & Education Partnerships – Regionally and Locally

Panelists represent business and educators, early childhood through adulthood. Panelists will demonstrate how they partner with businesses, educators, and community organizations to advance STEM education and support workforce development efforts.

Panelists will provide information on strategies that focus on ensuring all students are STEM-literate and educational opportunities are available to those students who are interested in pursuing rigorous STEM studies and careers in STEM fields. 

Attendees will take away materials to be used to develop and enhance partnerships on a regional and/or local level:

  • Regional and local strategies on developing and maintaining relationships

that can be replicated.

  • Evaluation summaries that illustrate the benefits of partnerships to business, educators,

and students.

  • Information on the type of involvement of over 300 organizations since 2011 with the

SE MA STEM Network including and business and educator alignment meetings, STEM Resource Fairs, educational programs, and events for STEM stakeholders.

  • Information on local initiatives including community team development, community events for students and parents, and work-based learning for educators and students.
  • Examples of the benefits of partnerships to business, educators, and students.

Attendees will identify the strategies presented that would be most helpful to them and share what they plan to do during the report out and if they plan to share what they have accomplished at a meeting in 2018 “Business & Education Partnerships - preparing students for success in the workplace” that will be held at AccuRounds in March 2018.


Moderators
MT

Michael Tamasi

President & CEO, AccuRounds and SE MA STEM Network Advisory Board Member

Speakers
RC

Rodney Clark

Dean, Attleboro Campus, Bristol Community College
DG

Debra Garvin

Education Coordinator, Early Childhood and School Age Programs, Robbins Children’s Program and SE MA STEM Network Advisory Board Member
TM

Teresa Murphy

Superintendent, Mansfield Public Schools and SE MA STEM Network Advisory Board Member


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room C

1:45pm

GPSTEM: Increasing STEM Credentials at Community Colleges

This session will provide an overview of the TAACCCT IV GPSTEM grant and its implementation at the 15 community colleges. The Complete College America Guided Pathways approach will be outlined, and representatives from Mass Bay and Middlesex Community College will deliver presentations on the successes experienced at their institutions as a result of the grant.


Speakers
PB

Phara Boyer

Navigator, Mass Bay Community College
EC

Emily Chambers

Assistant Director, GPSTEM, Massasoit Community College/GPSTEM Grant
PS

Philip Sisson

Provost and VIP of Academic and Student Affairs, Middlesex Community College


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Conference Room 210

1:45pm

MA PKAL Regional Network: Promoting Professional Development, Networking, and Workforce Readiness

The goal of this session is to introduce and invite participation in the Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) Massachusetts Regional Network by STEM faculty, staff and administrators at higher education institutions, and STEM industry representatives. During this session, members of the MA PKAL Regional Network will give the audience an introduction to the National PKAL Network and discuss the mission, vision, and goals of the Massachusetts Network to (1) increase STEM student success, persistence, and retention, (2) provide professional development and leadership development opportunities, (3) promote workforce readiness, and (4) disseminate resources. The panel will discuss progress toward the goals including background on past biannual Massachusetts network meetings in which STEM faculty from multiple institutions from across the state have shared best practices in higher education. After introducing the network, round table discussions will catalyze discussions between participants on how they and their institutions could benefit from participation in the network and how the network can best serve the needs their institutions. The panel is particularly interested in ideas and partnerships that address goals towards which the network has not made progress; ideas for topics and speakers for future regional meetings are of particular interest to the network steering committee. Finally, this will provide an excellent opportunity for institutions not currently involved in the network to attend these meetings and participate in the network.


Moderators
RW

Robin White

Assistant Professor of Biology, Westfield State University

Speakers
AB

Ann Billetz

Associate Professor of Biology, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts
LC

Lorrie Comeford

Professor of Chemistry, Salem State University
CD

Catherine Dignam

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Food Science, Framingham State University


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room E

1:45pm

Sanofi Genzyme and Oracle Partnerships with the University of Massachusetts Boston

This session synthesizes the successful partnership between UMass Boston’s College of Science and Mathematics and the Sanofi Genzyme and Oracle Corporations. Contributions of $1.5M over 5 years have been made for student support and research programs. Funding inspired an integrated set of education and social development activities that enhanced academic confidence and student social capital for persistence and graduation with STEM degrees. This relationship supported a deep engagement that contributed to increasing the overall CSM 6-year graduation rates which are now tracking at 60%, exceeding both overall national STEM and the university’s 6-year graduation rates, and approximately doubled the 6-year graduation rate compared to when CSM started a new Student Success Program.

Speakers will detail the engagement processes that led university and corporate representatives to develop mutual value propositions for students, stockholders, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The partnership depended on effective communication (both interpersonal and media-based), the development of metrics to measure impact, and commitment by both the industry and education leaders within the college. The panelists will discuss their perspectives on those dynamics as well as the importance of gathering and reporting data relevant to program objectives and the resultant analysis of risks and benefits. Panelists will highlight the development of the partnership and the critical contributions from the Dean and senior level corporate champions. Finally, the panelists will share additional insights on relationship building versus transactional strategies for attaining extramural funding for innovative student success programs and STEM workforce development activities.


Moderators
MM

Marshall Milner

Executive Director Science Training Programs, UMass Boston – College of Science and Mathematics

Speakers
FE

Felecia Edwards

Director of the CSM Student Success Center, UMass Boston – College of Science and Mathematics


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room A

1:45pm

School-wide STEM Day: A Recipe for Success

What can be done to excite students and teachers about STEM education? How to bridge the gap between school and out-of-school experience? A school-wide STEM day that engages students, teachers, and community members to solve authentic problems could be the solution.

This interactive session will walk participants along the schedule of a successful, best-practice and standards-based middle school STEM day from the first planning meeting to the closing assembly. The presenters include the principal of the school who led the planning committee, the 8th grade science teacher who led the implementation of the day, a member of the STEM Education Center who helped with the framework of the day as well as reaching out to community members, and a student who was engaged in her project long after the STEM day concluded.

A video will highlight parts of the day, and participants will be provided with a template to plan and draft their own STEM day.


Speakers
MD

Mia Dubosarsky

Director of Professional Development, The STEM Education Center at WPI
SH

Sharon Hobbs

Middle School Principal, Lincoln Public Schools
JR

Julie Reynolds

8th grade Science Teacher, Lincoln Public Schools
PR

Phoebe Ryan

6th Grade Student, Lincoln Public Schools


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Junior Ballroom

1:45pm

STEM and the Workforce: Preparation During the Early Years

A group of Massachusetts STEM industry veterans including JD Chesloff (Executive Director of the Massachusetts Business Roundtable) and Brian Cali (Senior Vice President, Ironwood Pharmaceuticals) will host a panel on how to fill the STEM workforce with talented, competent individuals by employing best practices in the classroom to increase student interest and literacy in STEM in the 4th – 8th grade range. They will explain the importance of STEM training and preparation during these critical years, using the unique approach of STEM enrichment non-profit Science from Scientists (SfS) and home robotics company iRobot as models. SfS sends the same two real, charismatic scientists into 4th – 8th grade classrooms, during school, every other week for the entire academic year to teach hands-on, engaging STEM lessons aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) frameworks. iRobot's national STEM outreach program focuses on encouraging students K-16 to enter and remain in STEM fields by providing real life examples of robotics for students, teachers and educational groups.


Speakers
BC

Brian Cali

Senior Vice President, Ironwood Pharmaceuticals
JC

JD Chesloff

Executive Director, Massachusetts Business Roundtable
LF

Lisa Freed

STEM Program Manager, iRobot
IK

Isa Kaftal Zimmerman

Principal, IKZ Advisors


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room D

1:45pm

Tiny House: Three Public High School Multidisciplinary STEM Classes – Architecture, Engineering, & Build

Learn about Marblehead High School’s only cross-curricular suite of three STEAM classes based on the Tiny House movement and how teachers partnered with community groups & members of the community to offer & refine such a complex project in a public school.


Speakers
MA

Mike Agosti

Teacher - Wood Shop, Robotics & Engineering, Marblehead High School
RF

Ryan Forcier

Teacher – Physics & Engineering, Marblehead High School
CL

Cathy Landergan

Teacher – CAD & Architecture, Marblehead High School


Tuesday November 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:35pm
Meeting Room B

2:35pm

Break
Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:35pm - 2:55pm
DCU Center 50 Foster Street, Worcester, MA

2:55pm

Building a Coherent University-School District-Industry Partnership to Scaffold STEM Learning

In this session we will describe the Waltham STEM Collaboratory (WSC). The WSC is focused on building and sustaining a longitudinal and district wide STEM program for middle school students. The WSC consists of (1) Waltham Public Schools, (2) Faculty from the Lynch School of Education (Drs. Barnett, Kim,, and Zhang), (3) the Lemelson-MIT invent program (http://lemelson.mit.edu/jv-inventeams), and the (4) Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council (MassTLC: http://www.masstlc.org/). We will discuss how the collaborative work directly addresses the strategic priorities for Waltham Public Schools (WPS) in STEM education. Specifically, how the work is enabling WPS to create transformative STEM experiences for all middle-school aged youth. A special focus is on youth from under-represented populations in STEM to not only participate in rich STEM experiences to but also to engage in experiences that build on their interests, prepare them for high school, and enable youth pursue STEM fields in the future.


Moderators
MB

Mike Barnett

Professor of Science Education, Boston College

Speakers
SC

Stephanie Couch

Executive Director, Lemelson-MIT Program, MIT School of Engineering
DJ

David Jackson

After-School STEM Coordinator, Waltham Public Schools; Graduate Student, Boston College
HM

Heather Metallides

Science Director, Waltham Public Schools
HZ

Helen Zhang

Research Professor, Boston College


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Meeting Room D

2:55pm

College to Career Pathways: A New Online Tool for Adult Learners Returning to Education

In 2014, the 15 Massachusetts community colleges received $5 million from the U.S. Department of Labor to create an online tool for people to research high-demand, high-paying occupations, and to connect to community college programs that prepare them for their career goals. The GPSTEM Student Pathways Application will soon be launching in beta, for use by the public, and at career centers and colleges. Come see this powerful new tool in action and learn how it will enable job seekers to get on the path to higher education and rewarding STEM careers. Behind the scenes, the data project will enable researchers to explore skills gaps by regions and track employment outcomes for program completers. These tools will help community colleges align programs with workforce demands, and will support the regional planning efforts under WIOA.


Moderators
KM

Kathleen M. Kirby

GPSTEM Statewide Project Director, Massasoit Community College

Speakers
GB

Gregory Bunn

Assistant Secretary for Policy and Planning, Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development
DL

David Leavitt

Executive Director of Institutional Research, Bunker Hill Community College


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Meeting Room B

2:55pm

Engineering in the Out-of-School-Time Setting

This session is designed for educators working with K-8 students in afterschool or camp settings and will explore the benefits of introducing STEM experiences into the out-of-school-time (OST) setting. Collaborating to expand access to STEM opportunities, the Museum of Science, Boston and the Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership (MAP) will discuss the many benefits of including engineering challenges in afterschool programs.

In this session, participants will experience a condensed version of the free-to-download OST curriculum developed by the Museum of Science, Boston. Participating in this engineering activity as a learner and reflecting as an educator will help participants contextualize the problem-solving, collaborating, and communication skills students develop in quality STEM activities. Participants will gain comfort and confidence about knowing what to expect and how to facilitate engineering activities in their own programs, and learn how to access free-to-download curricula resources for K-8 OST settings.


Speakers
SM

Shannon McManus

Professional Development Manager, Engineering is Elementary, Museum of Science
AW

Ardith Wieworka

CEO, Massachusetts Afterschool Partnership


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Grand Ballroom Center

2:55pm

Evaluation of a Global Initiative to Teach Engineering and Global Competency to Middle Schoolers

This presentation will discuss the evaluation of a global program that integrates engineering with global competencies and works with thousands of middle school students and educators across the globe. The evaluation included data from several hundred students in five countries including the U.S., Jordan, South Africa, Vietnam, and Malawi. To date, evaluation findings indicate that the program was successful at achieving many of its intended impacts on children and educators. This presentation will provide researchers, evaluators, and practitioners with an introduction to the global engineering program; a description of the evaluation design and instruments; a description of the evaluation participants; findings related to intended impacts; a summary of the challenges faced in the study and lessons learned; factors to consider when planning similar evaluations; and factors to consider when implementing similar programs.


Speakers
CP

Christine Paulsen

President, Concord Evaluation Group


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Meeting Room A

2:55pm

Exploring General Education Foundations for STEM Transfer Students

One of the Department of Higher Education’s (DHE) priorities is to develop a seamless transfer system for students. In September 2016, the DHE launched the new MassTransfer website that features its MassTransfer A2B Pathways, Commonwealth Commitment and Course Equivalency Database. The DHE, in collaboration with the community colleges, state universities, and University of Massachusetts campuses, began exploring the potential of building an alternative to the current Gen Ed Foundation that would allow STEM students to take the foundational courses related to their major prior to transfer. The STEM Gen Ed Foundation removes barriers to on-time completion for STEM students who intend to earn baccalaureate degrees and better supports them to take full advantage of the high-quality, affordable education provided at one of our 15 community colleges.


Moderators
AL

Allison Little

Executive Director, STEM, Massachusetts Department of Higher Education

Speakers
MC

Margaret Caroll

Dean of Science, Technology, Engineering, and STEM, Framingham State University
CK

Charles Kaminski

Dean of Business, Science, Mathematics & Technology, Berkshire Community College
EQ

Elena Quiroz-Livanis

Director of Academic Policy and Student Success, Massachusetts Department of Higher Education


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Conference Room 210

2:55pm

Integrating the Question Formulation Technique into Your Work with STEM Students

A question is a propulsive agent that can spark curiosity and fuel creativity, understanding, and imagination. We know from educators across the country that question-formulation is an increasingly vital skill for critical thinking, research and innovation, and civic engagement in the 21st century.  And as a part of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), students are expected to formulate and explore their own questions. Yet, it is rare that the skill of question formulation is deliberately taught to students. How can we transform teaching and learning and build the capacity for all students to acquire sophisticated higher order thinking skills through question-asking?

This session builds on the introductory session offered earlier in the day. Attendees will dive deeper into the planning, lesson design, and facilitation of the Question Formulation Technique (QFT), a simple, yet powerful step-by-step process which teaches students how to ask, improve, and use their own questions. On their own initiative and without any mandate, more than 250,000 educators in diverse pre-K through higher education settings worldwide are now using the QFT simply because it helps their students become more curious and fully engaged learners.

In this hands-on, active learning experience, participants will leave with a deep understanding of the strategy, tools for best practices in planning, design, and facilitation, and the ability to immediately apply the QFT with students and share it with colleagues in K-12 STEM classrooms of any level. Work with a range of planning tools and classroom resources and have opportunities to receive feedback.


Speakers
NB

Nicole Bolduc

7th Grade Science Teacher, Ellington Public Schools, Ellington, CT
DR

Dan Rothstein

Co-Director, The Right Question Institute
SW

Sarah Westbrook

Director of Professional Learning, The Right Question Institute


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Grand Ballroom North

2:55pm

Novel Engineering: An Integrated Approach to Engineering and Literacy

Novel Engineering, an NSF-funded project at the Tufts Center for Engineering Education and Outreach, is engaging 1st-8th grade students and educators in engineering by using books as a context for client-centered, open-ended design challenges. In this hands-on workshop, participants will be introduced to the Novel Engineering approach. They will watch video of students doing Novel Engineering, engage in a conceptual planning activity, and look at examples of Novel Engineering in the classroom and think about places Novel Engineering could support their own work with students.

This session will begin with an overview of Novel Engineering that will include examples of books and projects that have been done in K-8 classrooms. We will engage in a planning activity around A Long Walk to Water, which contains a realistic fiction account of Nya, and chronicles her life in Southern Sudan and her daily trek to get water for her family. After this experience, participants will brainstorm ways that Novel Engineering could be included in their own classrooms. The final portion of the session will include watching videos of students engaging in Novel Engineering activities in classrooms and discussing engineering moments in the videos as well as ways in which Novel Engineering inspires deeper learning in classrooms. The overall goal is to help educators recognize the beginning of engineering in students in an interdisciplinary activity and gain an understanding of the basics of the Novel Engineering approach.


Speakers
EM

Elissa Milto

Director of Outreach, Tufts University Center for Engineering Education and Outreach


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Meeting Room C

2:55pm

Seeds of STEM: Early Childhood Engineering Curriculum from Diversity and Collaboration Perspective

Seeds of STEM is a high-quality engineering curriculum that was developed to enhance preschool children’s skills of problem solving. To achieve this, we developed the curriculum through the collaboration of WPI, The College of Holy Cross, and Worcester Head Start. In addition, the partnership conducted professional development workshops for all Worcester Head Start teachers that focused on the engineering design process and diversity in STEM. This presentation is intended to inform Pre-K educators, administrators, para-professionals, policy makers, and researchers who study the early learning of STEM. In our session, we will present the Seeds of STEM research based framework for high quality early childhood STEM and diversity in the classroom. We will provide examples of high quality tasks from Seeds of STEM curriculum and share results from Engineering in the classroom and Diversity training teacher workshops, teacher feedback forms, and video observations of applied learning.


Speakers
MJ

Melissa-Sue John

Co-PI, Seeds of STEM, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
SW

Susmitha Wunnava

Graduate Student, Worcester Polytechnic Institute


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Junior Ballroom

2:55pm

So Much More Than Counting: Talking with Young Children About Mathematical Concepts

In this interactive workshop, we will share videos created by preschool teachers in Chelsea Achieve in Mathematics (CAM). The short videos show preschool children engaged in higher order thinking about mathematical concepts, including dual language learners and children with disabilities. Following each video, the participants will discuss with peers how the teachers created the opportunity for the higher order thinking, how the children reacted, and how these activities link with the Mass Curriculum Frameworks for Mathematics, and the Guidelines for Preschool Learning Experiences. Following each video discussion, the facilitators will summarize with the developmental level of the children in relationship to learning trajectories. At the conclusion of the session, individuals will reflect on how to use the reflection process in their own practice with preschool children or preschool teachers.


Moderators
ML

Mary Lu Love

Senior Early Childhood Specialist, University of Massachusetts Boston

Speakers
JK

Jennifer Kearns-Fox

Early Childhood Specialist, University of Massachusetts Boston
KK

Kristen Kent

Early Childhood Curriculum Coach, Chelsea Public Schools


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Meeting Room E

2:55pm

The daVinci Program: Building a STEAM Learning Community

Welcome to Newton South High School’s STEAM program, daVinci. Our students apply cross discipline ideas to solve real world problems and collaborate with each other, learning how to work together to build a strong supportive community. We would like to share our journey, struggles, and success in building a STEAM program and classroom environment. Please join us in learning about secondary STEAM education in action while getting a chance to apply these ideas of multi-content integration, exploratory learning, collaboration and problem based discovery to your own classroom, lessons, and school.


Speakers
MB

Molly Baring-Gould

Art Teacher, Newton South High School
AR

Amy Richard

Biochemistry Teacher, Newton South High School
DS

Divya Shannon

Mathematics Teacher, Newton South High School


Tuesday November 14, 2017 2:55pm - 3:45pm
Grand Ballroom South

3:30pm

Exhibit Hall Closes
Tuesday November 14, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Exhibit Hall